Making the most of those first parent/teacher interviews

Written by Tina Myrteza

March 9, 2022

Parent/teacher interviews can sometimes feel pointless as you go to such enormous effort to arrive at school only to be given 5 minutes with your child’s teacher (or even less if the parents before you have tried to take more than their allocated time.)  Primary school parents generally receive 15 minutes, but that alone is limited time to truly grasp how your child is progressing.  Your frustrations are shared  equally by the teacher who is not only watching the time but is also trying to give you enough information within your designated time slot. 

The teacher will have their own agenda of what they want to share with you, but some ways you can support this process are;

  • Be punctual to your interview time and be sure to let the teacher know if you need to change or reschedule.
  • Take notes if necessary
  • Use the time to build a relationship with your child’s teacher. First impressions can go a long way.
  • Show your willingness to support the teacher. A teacher who knows that parents are on board is more likely to communicate their concerns throughout the year.
  • Leave any negative past experiences behind. This is a new year and a new person, so give them a chance as they may prove to be the best thing to ever happen to your child!
  • Save any big concerns for a separate appointment time.
  • Show appreciation for the additional time the teacher is putting into interviews. Remember, they have been teaching all day and have had to prepare for each one of these interviews out of school hours.  Interviews can go for weeks depending on the class size and attending the interviews at night often requires finding childcare for their own children.

Building a positive relationship with your child’s teacher is one of the most important things you can do for your child.  Creating a working partnership with the school will show your child that you are all on the same team. 

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